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Practice History

Lea House, and its neighbour Downham House, were built at the beginning of the mid nineteenth century for four hundred and seventy guineas each. The included the building in Osborne Mews at the bottom of the garden where there was stabling for four horses, a coach house, a hayloft  and accommodation for the coachman and family.

In 1928 after a year at sea as a ship’s surgeon, Dr John Cuddigan joined his uncle in a general medical practice in Clarence Road adjacent to the Princess Christian Hospital. On his marriage, he bought Lea House, changed the name to Lee House after the river which flows through the city of Cork and set up home and practice. The original consulting room was the present reception office, the waiting room the same as today. For the ‘Panel Patients’ he put in a door on the west side of the house approached by wooden steps – the private patients came through the front door!

One patient recalls that as a small boy he came direct from school to Lee House to polish the brasses and open the door for private patients. We have seen a few changes since then.

Dr Cuddigan lived with his family at Lee House until the end of the Second World War when he moved to the Old Malt House at Oakley Green. The practice house was tenanted by a succession of assistants – Dr Gillespie Hill: Dr Eleanor O’Donovan, famed for her hat and for keeping patients waiting for two hours: Dr George Mandow who became a Consultant Anaesthetist at the inception of the National Health Service in 1948 and finally Dr Max Murray who was much loved by his three thousand patients.

In 1961 our very own Dr Michael Mower became a Partner and bought Lee House. That same year, Dr John MacInnes moved from Beaumont Road to Lee House – the filing cabinets and furniture were trundled round on Joe Quatermain’s handcart!

Following the death of Dr MacInnes, Dr Alan Stokes joined the practice for a brief spell before emigrating to Canada. He was replaced by Dr Beresford. After a long illness, Dr Murray retired and his place was taken by Dr Baines. The time was ripe for the first major refurbishment of the house and the improvements were greatly appreciated by both patients and staff.

Dr Michael Mower’s retirement in 2000 saw the care of Lee House move into the capable hands of Dr Isabel Mower.

Changes in the nature of medical practice have resulted in extensive changes and improvements to the accommodation over the years but we think that this wonderful old house still retains its grace and charm.

On 31st July 2013 Dr Isabel Mower and Dr Basab Barua retired from General Practice.

This marks the end of the Mower family caring for NHS patients in Windsor.

Lee House was handed over into the capable hands of Dr S Jabbar & Partners.



 
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